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The **unicorn** is a legendary creature that has been described since antiquity as a beast with a single large, pointed, spiraling horn projecting from its forehead. The unicorn was depicted in ancient seals of the Indus Valley Civilization and was mentioned by the ancient Greeks in accounts of natural history by various writers, including Ctesias, Strabo, Pliny the Younger, and Aelian.[2] The Bible also describes an animal, the re'em, which some versions translate as unicorn. ![Unicorn image](https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/82/DomenichinounicornPalFarnese.jpg/220px-DomenichinounicornPalFarnese.jpg) In European folklore, the unicorn is often depicted as a white horse-like or goat-like animal with a long horn and cloven hooves (sometimes a goat's beard). In the Middle Ages and Renaissance, it was commonly described as an extremely wild woodland creature, a symbol of purity and grace, which could be captured only by a virgin. In the encyclopedias, its horn was said to have the power to render poisoned water potable and to heal sickness. In medieval and Renaissance times, the tusk of the narwhal was sometimes sold as unicorn horn.
**Pegasus** (Greek: Πήγασος, Pḗgasos; Latin: Pegasus, Pegasos) is a famous pterippus, a mythical winged divine stallion who is one of the most recognized creatures in Greek mythology. Although often misused in popular culture, the term "Pegasus" is a proper noun, referring to a particular character, whereas the term "pterippus" (plural: "pterippi") is the generic name for the species of winged horses. Pegasus is usually depicted as pure white in color. Pegasus is a child of the Olympian god Poseidon. He was foaled by the Gorgon Medusa[1] upon her death, when the hero Perseus decapitated her. Pegasus is the brother of Chrysaor and the uncle of Geryon. Greco-Roman poets wrote about the ascent of Pegasus to heaven after his birth, and his subsequent obeisance to Zeus, king of the gods, who instructed him to bring lightning and thunder from Olympus. Friend of the Muses, Pegasus created Hippocrene, the fountain on Mt. Helicon. Pegasus was caught by the Greek hero Bellerophon, near the fountain Peirene, with the help of Athena and Poseidon. Pegasus allowed Bellerophon to ride him in order to defeat the monstrous Chimera, which led to many other exploits. Bellerophon later fell from the winged horse's back while trying to reach Mount Olympus. Afterwards, Zeus transformed Pegasus into the eponymous constellation.
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